Liars will be prosecuted

A new experiment shows that unlike the swimming swimmers and baking bakers, would-be “cheaters” actually cheat less. In a series of three experiments, participants were given a chance to claim unearned money at the expense of the researchers. There were two conditions in each experiment, and the only difference between them was in the wording of the instructions. In the first condition participants were told that researchers were interested in “how common cheating is on college campuses,” while in the second, they wondered “how common cheaters are on college campuses.”

This is a subtle but, as it turned out, significant difference. Participants in the “cheating” condition claimed significantly more cash than those in the “cheater” condition, who, similar to when we tempted people who had sworn on the bible, did not cheat at all. This was true in both face-to-face and online interactions, indicating that relative anonymity cannot displace the implications of self-identifying as a cheater. People may allow themselves to cheat sometimes, but not if it involves identifying themselves as Cheaters.

[…] maybe beginning tax documents with a warning that “liars will be prosecuted” would help keep people from lying on their tax returns.

http://danariely.com/2012/12/29/whats-in-a-name/

Cf. http://danariely.com/2012/04/10/taxes-and-cheating/
https://www.google.com/search?q=The+(Honest)+Truth+About+Dishonesty